Videos


Role of Critical Thinking in Political Science (1 of 5)
Role of Critical Thinking in Political Science (1 of 5)

Dr. Bidisha Biswas describes how she determined to focus on critical thinking and show students strategies to think critically.
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Culture of Critical Thinking (2 of 5)
Culture of Critical Thinking (2 of 5)

Dr. Bidisha Biswas discusses how critical thinking has become part of the culture in political science as a skill for student success.
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Critical Thinking Tactics (3 of 5)
Critical Thinking Tactics (3 of 5)

Dr. Bidisha Biswas challenges students critical thinking and communication skills via a variety of strategies.
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Inspiring Critical Thinking through Writing (4 of 5)
Inspiring Critical Thinking through Writing (4 of 5)

Dr. Bidisha Biswas helps students make progress toward the kind of critical thinking that she and employers seek.
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Becoming Critical Thinkers (5 of 5)
Becoming Critical Thinkers (5 of 5)

Dr. Bidisha Biswas helps students make progress toward the kind of critical thinking that she and employers seek.
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Engaging Critical Thinking via Student Ownership (1 of 5)
Engaging Critical Thinking via Student Ownership (1 of 5)

Dr. Ed Love engages student in critical thinking with student-centered discussions.
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Thinking Critically & Innovatively about Experimental Design (2 of 5)
Thinking Critically & Innovatively about Experimental Design (2 of 5)

Dr. Ed Love experiments with new teaching strategies that promote innovative thinking and get students to think critically about experimental design.
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Critical Thinking Payoffs & Responsibilities (3 of 5)
Critical Thinking Payoffs & Responsibilities (3 of 5)

Dr. Ed Love believes everyone benefits from the focus on innovation and critical thinking and helps prepare students for the future.
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Intentional Use of Surprise in Teaching Critical Thinking (4 of 5)
Intentional Use of Surprise in Teaching Critical Thinking (4 of 5)

Dr. Ed Love teaches critical evaluation of innovation with the element of surprise.
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Analysis and Creativity (5 of 5)
Analysis and Creativity (5 of 5)

Dr. Ed Love helps students develop analytical and creative skills.
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Critical Thinking Roots (1 of 5)
Critical Thinking Roots (1 of 5)

Dr. Mark Neff discusses how he brings his background into a focus on critical thinking to his classes.
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Walking Through Critical Thinking (2 of 5)
Walking Through Critical Thinking (2 of 5)

Dr. Mark Neff describes how he “walks” his students through the process of critical thinking as they discuss key issues and how he stays flexible with coverage and assessments.
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Benefits of Critical Thinking in Any Discipline (3 of 5)
Benefits of Critical Thinking in Any Discipline (3 of 5)

Dr. Mark Neff helps students make sense of disciplinary perspectives using strategies useful in any discipline.
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Playing Devil's Advocate to Promote Critical Thinking (4 of 5)
Playing Devil's Advocate to Promote Critical Thinking (4 of 5)

Dr. Mark Neff creates space for students to develop their ideas in relation to critical thinking skills.
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Conflicting Simultaneous Explanations in Critical Thinking (5 of 5)
Conflicting Simultaneous Explanations in Critical Thinking (5 of 5)

Dr. Mark Neff shares an case he uses to help students understand the complexity of policy decisions.
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The Path to Inquiry-based Learning at WWU (1 of 5)
The Path to Inquiry-based Learning at WWU (1 of 5)

Dr. Boudreaux describes how his past experiences with inquiry-based learning have influenced his current teaching and Western Washington University’s physics labs. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Teaching by Questioning in Physics (2 of 5)
Teaching by Questioning in Physics (2 of 5)

Dr. Boudreaux believes inquiry-based learning is particularly well-suited to learning physics and provides a view of the introductory physics labs at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Learning Benefits of IBL (3 of 5)
Learning Benefits of IBL (3 of 5)

Dr. Boudreaux thinks it is especially beneficial to learn physics using inquiry-based learning methods and describes how physics education research informed the design of the physics labs at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Helping Students into IBL (4 of 5)
Helping Students into IBL (4 of 5)

Dr. Boudreaux describes how to prepare students for inquiry-based learning and one of the introductory physics lab teaching assistants talks about how this model helps students work together for a deeper understanding of physics at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Getting Started Teaching IBL (5 of 5)
Getting Started Teaching IBL (5 of 5)

Dr. Boudreaux of Western Washington University’s physics and astronomy department shares advice for instructors who are getting started using inquiry-based learning. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Innovative Teaching Showcase Highlights 2015-16
Innovative Teaching Showcase Highlights 2015-16

Highlights Video for the 2015-16 Innovative Teaching Showcase on Inquiry-based Learning.
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Inquiry-based Learning Impact in Science Education (1 of 5)
Inquiry-based Learning Impact in Science Education (1 of 5)

Science Education faculty at Western Washington University present the inquiry-based learning method, how the design evolved, and how it has impacted learning and teaching.
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Classroom Environment with Inquiry-based Learning (2 of 5)
Classroom Environment with Inquiry-based Learning (2 of 5)

Science Education faculty at Western Washington University prepare students for inquiry-based learning by being up front about the method, using their role as facilitators to help students take ownership of the ideas they explore.
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Inquiry-based Learning Across Disciplines (3 of 5)
Inquiry-based Learning Across Disciplines (3 of 5)

Science Education faculty at Western Washington University discuss approaches to using inquiry-based learning in various disciplines and how they spread the word with University colleagues.
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Group Dynamics with Inquiry-based Learning (4 of 5)
Group Dynamics with Inquiry-based Learning (4 of 5)

Science Education faculty at Western Washington University talk about how they manage group dynamics and group work in their inquiry-based learning courses.
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Course Design Advice with Inquiry-based Learning (5 of 5)
Course Design Advice with Inquiry-based Learning (5 of 5)

Science Education faculty at Western Washington University share tips for getting started with teaching using inquiry-based learning.
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Path to IBL in Number Theory (1 of 5)
Path to IBL in Number Theory (1 of 5)

Dr. Treneer describes her early influences with inquiry-based learning and how she developed her own curriculum for the number theory class she teaches at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Math as IBL (2 of 5)
Math as IBL (2 of 5)

Dr. Treneer believes her mathematics classes are particularly well-suited to inquiry-based learning and shares how she carries out her number theory class at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Developing Community with IBL (3 of 5)
Developing Community with IBL (3 of 5)

Dr. Treneer fosters a community of learners in her inquiry-based learning mathematics class at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Culture of Inquiry in Number Theory (4 of 5)
Culture of Inquiry in Number Theory (4 of 5)

Dr. Treneer sees a “culture of inquiry” transpire in her inquiry-based learning mathematics class at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Role of the IBL Teacher (5 of 5)
Role of the IBL Teacher (5 of 5)

Dr. Treneer discusses the role of the teacher in her inquiry-based learning mathematics class at Western Washington University. Part of the Innovative Teaching Showcase 2015-2016, created by the Center for Instructional Innovation & Assessment at Western Washington University. http://cii.wwu.edu/showcase2015/ Music: The Martyr and the Magician (Instrumentals) by Michael Howard is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.
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Teaching Philosophy
Teaching Philosophy

Amber Sudduth Bone discusses how her background influences the ways she incorporates diverse elements into her music courses and how she became inspired to explore teaching education literature and teaching diverse learners.
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Balancing the Vision
Balancing the Vision

Amber Sudduth Bone balances the vision of a music performance with audience perceptions, customizes productions to communicate cultural interpretations, and challenges herself with the many roles involved in a production.
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Teaching Learning Benefits
Teaching Learning Benefits

Amber Sudduth Bone realized her success and reward in teaching related to her students’ success, and part of an effective course design involves reaching diverse learners.
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Inclusion in Music
Inclusion in Music

What are some of the big questions to discuss in music education? Amber Sudduth Bone addresses these as she explores ways to address gender stereotyping in roles and enhance the music program with non-traditional music.
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Student Perspectives
Student Perspectives

By reaching out to her students, Amber Sudduth Bone brings her students’ various backgrounds into the curriculum, even in her large general education course.
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Diversity as the Norm
Diversity as the Norm

Presenting multiculturalism as the norm in her Communication Studies classes, Heather Davidson’s students learn that seeing differences as a benefit helps dissolve barriers.
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Empathy in Class Activities
Empathy in Class Activities

Heather Davidson embeds the "cornerstone of empathy" with class activities and she describes a class activity that most clearly engages students in developing empathic communication.
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Empathy in Action
Empathy in Action

Heather Davidson’s Communication Studies students are often inspired to further develop empathic communication skills as they work with their peers and community partners.
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Teaching Philosophy and Praxis
Teaching Philosophy and Praxis

Heather Davidson shares her teaching philosophy and how it influences the way she teaches Communication Studies courses using empathy to engage students and help them explore multicultural perspectives.
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Walking the Walk
Walking the Walk

Modeling the power of multicultural awareness and empathic communications for her students, Heather Davidson and her students work with community partners and valuable campus colleagues.
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Ideas for Wrestling with Race
Ideas for Wrestling with Race

For those who might be at the beginning stages of infusing multiple perspectives into their courses, Lysa Rivera offers sage advice for incorporating the sometimes touchy subjects of race and social justice, and shares how she helps students connect race issues in literature to their current lives.
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Writing Facilitates Thinking
Writing Facilitates Thinking

Lysa Rivera strongly believes that writing helps students develop their ideas and concepts about the material in her writing and literature courses—helping them make sense of their own experiences and assumptions.
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Self Realization
Self Realization

Lysa Rivera discusses how her background influenced her use of multicultural perspectives in her English classes, including her focus on Chicano/a and African American writers.
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Assignments and Assumptions
Assignments and Assumptions

In her multicultural literature courses, Lysa Rivera encourages her students to challenge their assumptions, analyze texts with critical lenses, and connect works to modern-day materials.
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Rewards and Inspiration
Rewards and Inspiration

Lysa Rivera shares what is most rewarding about teaching inclusivity in her English classes, despite student resistance—and because of how students become inspired to continue multicultural pursuits.
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Connecting with Blended Learning
Connecting with Blended Learning

Paula Dagnon’s (Western Washington Univ.) teaching philosophy is reflected in her Instructional Technology and Education class where she focuses on the intersections of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and technology knowledge, as well as enriching the course experience by using a blended/online format to reach a diverse set of learners.
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Blended Learning Tips and Tricks
Blended Learning Tips and Tricks

Having been down this road before in her Instructional Technology and Education class, Paula Dagnon (Western Washington Univ.) shares some of her most useful strategies for using blended learning.
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Blended Learning Benefits
Blended Learning Benefits

The convenience, flexibility, and geographic accessibility of the blended learning format are just some of the ways Paula Dagnon (Western Washington Univ.) believes the method is useful for her Instructional Technology and Education students.
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Rewards of Blended Teaching and Learning
Rewards of Blended Teaching and Learning

By teaching her Instructional Technology and Education in a blended format, Paula Dagnon (Western Washington Univ.) sees greater engagement with students, including having more one-on-one time, and finds she is more organized and thoughtful in her teaching.
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Blended Learning
Blended Learning

Paula Dagnon (Western Washington Univ.) describes two of her favorite assignments for use in a blended delivery course: the keyword wiki (a collaboratively created class resource) and the introductory video assignment (a “getting to know you” activity that also delves into some of the necessary skills involved in her Instructional Technology and Education class.
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Online Teaching & Learning
Online Teaching & Learning

Rebekah Green (Western Washington Univ.) created a mostly online version of her Human Ecology and Sustainability class which gave her a chance to see her material in new ways and interact with her students in new ways, including through the Fishing Boat Exercise, a natural resource management simulation game she conducted via web conference.
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Blended Learning Benefits
Blended Learning Benefits

Rebekah Green (Western Washington Univ.) found surprising learning benefits for her blended/online Human Ecology and Sustainability students, including getting the perspectives of the more quiet students, having discussions with more depth, including students from diverse geographic and demographic settings, and creating more class time via providing mini video lectures.
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Online Learning Perceptions
Online Learning Perceptions

While in Istanbul, Turkey with an outreach group educating the public about seismic risk, Rebekah Green (Western Washington Univ.) and her team experimented with online learning in order to meet the high demand for the training they developed. At that point, she did not think the method would be useful for university teaching, but the experience opened the possibilities when her Human Ecology and Sustainability course doubled in size.
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Lessons Learned
Lessons Learned

Rebekah Green (Western Washington Univ.) shares what she learned by transitioning her Human Ecology and Sustainability course to a blended/online format, including tips, caveats, and ideas for expanding the notion of this method in a concept and community-based course.
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Need For Online Tools
Need For Online Tools

Rebekah Green (Western Washington Univ.) approached blended and online learning with caution, but the technology-enhanced assignments she developed for her newly enlarged Human Ecology and Sustainability course met the needs for her and her students.
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2013 Showcase Highlights
2013 Showcase Highlights

Highlights video for the "Blended Learning" Showcase.
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Benefits of Blended
Benefits of Blended

The biggest thing blended learning did for Jerimiah Welch was increase the amount of face-to-face time he could spend interacting with students, making the most of their time, and providing assistance to those who need it most.
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Transitioning to Blended Learning
Transitioning to Blended Learning

Developing a set of engineering video lectures was a daunting task for Jerimiah Welch initially, but with the newly available class time he was able to create relationships with his students, improve the curriculum, and implement a peer review task that mimics real world applications of the projects.
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Getting Started with Blended Learning
Getting Started with Blended Learning

Jerimiah Welch (Western Washington Univ.) recommends finding campus support for the work of developing blended materials. Next, he suggests looking carefully at the parts of the course that take the most time, developing online content to address these areas, and reevaluating how to spend face-to-face time.
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Supporting Project Work with Blended Learning
Supporting Project Work with Blended Learning

Utilizing self-paced videos allowed Jerimiah Welch (Western Washington Univ.) to use class meetings to provide feedback, carry out face-to-face grading, and create mini communities for the students to develop support systems.
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Blended Learning Rewards
Blended Learning Rewards

In addition to being able to use students' time and his time more effectively, Jerimiah Welch (Western Washington Univ.) believes that the mini lecture method helps students learn better. By breaking concepts down into smaller chunks, students have more opportunities to practice and apply concepts, the quality of their work has improved, and they find it more interesting!
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2012 Showcase Highlights
2012 Showcase Highlights

Highlights video for the "Teaching Civic Engagement" Showcase.
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From Experiential Education to Service Learning
From Experiential Education to Service Learning

Robin Kodner's (Biology) background in experiential outdoor education was a major influence on how she approached the design of her service-learning oriented Biometrics course at WWU.
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Getting Started with Service Learning
Getting Started with Service Learning

The very first time Robin Kodner (Biology) taught her Biometrics course at WWU, she incorporated service-learning, working with WWU's Center for Service-Learning, because she believes it is the best way to teach statistics.
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Supplementary Benefits for Students
Supplementary Benefits for Students

While some of the outcomes of learning Biometrics via a service-learning model benefit students in the long-run, Robin Kodner (Biology) believes the connections to team skills, professionalism, jobs exploration, and leadership help engage students in deeper, longer-lasting learning.
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Cultivating Civic Engagement via Real-World Data
Cultivating Civic Engagement via Real-World Data

Robin Kodner (Biology) cultivated civic engagement in her statistics students by involving them with community partners to analyze real-world data--and she suggests how valuable this approach would be in a variety of disciplines and for a range of local non-profits.
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Service-Learning Design Challenges
Service-Learning Design Challenges

Robin Kodner (Biology) describes some of her lessons learned from teaching her Biometrics course using a service-learning model, including the value of orienting students to this process-oriented course.
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Civic-Engagement Teaching Roots
Civic-Engagement Teaching Roots

Gene Myers (Huxley College of the Environment) describes how his 'journey to civic engagement' influenced the variety of teaching methods he employs in different classes.
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Spring Block: Ground Work and Wrap Up
Spring Block: Ground Work and Wrap Up

Because the 'Spring Block' program at Huxley College of the Environment provides real-world learning experiences for the students, Gene Myers believes that students are self-motivated to engage in their learning and best serve their community partners.
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Spring Block: Design and Plans
Spring Block: Design and Plans

Through Huxley College of the Environment, Gene Myers and colleagues run a 'Spring Block' program for the cohort of students in their last year of the program; the curriculum builds content knowledge as well as a sense of trust, engagement, community, and service.
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Challenges and Benefits of Civic Engagement
Challenges and Benefits of Civic Engagement

Gene Myers (Huxley College of the Environment) explains his role in supporting students as they rise to the challenges of real-world community projects and in 'opening the door' for students as they become more self-directed and well-prepared for their future professions.
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Students as Denizens
Students as Denizens

Gene Myers (Huxley College of the Environment) explains that not only are we citizens, but also 'denizens,' recognizing our place in natural environments and rising to the challenges and responsibilities of this role.
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Positive Outcomes of Service Learning
Positive Outcomes of Service Learning

Sheila Webb (Journalism) reveals the most valuable outcomes for both students and community partners in working with service-learning projects in her Advanced Visual Journalism class; interestingly, getting feedback from community members rated very highly with some students.
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Tips for Implementing Service Learning
Tips for Implementing Service Learning

Sheila Webb (Journalism) shares her most recommended tips for implementing service-learning into courses, including strategies for matching students with community partners.
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Value of Civic Engagement
Value of Civic Engagement

Sheila Webb (Journalism) discusses why civic engagement and service-learning opportunities are important to her, her students, and the community partners; further, she talks about the value of incorporating real-world applications of course concepts.
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Service Learning Design and Orientation
Service Learning Design and Orientation

The biggest challenges, according to Sheila Webb (Journalism), to incorporating service-learning into her courses are “logistical and procedural.” She describes some of the most valuable strategies she has for orienting students to this approach to teaching Advanced Visual Journalism.
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Interacting with Community Partners
Interacting with Community Partners

Since implementing service-learning projects in her Advanced Visual Journalism class, Sheila Webb (Journalism) has developed methods for addressing challenges both for students and community partners; specifically, in facilitating positive collaborations and interactions.
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Professional Peer Connections
Professional Peer Connections

Garth Amundson (Art) describes how peer learning relates professional development opportunities for his students; one of his students adds his perspective.
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Bringing Peer Learning to Teaching
Bringing Peer Learning to Teaching

Garth Amundson (Art) shares how his own graduate student experience with interactive peer learning, via the Future Professoriate Program, informs his teaching practice today; one of his students adds her perspective.
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One-Room Schoolhouse
One-Room Schoolhouse

Garth Amundson (Art) describes his classroom as a "one-room schoolhouse" where students extend their learning by sharing their strengths in the classroom; several of his students share their perspectives on peer learning in his classes.
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Today's Peers, Tomorrow's Contacts
Today's Peers, Tomorrow's Contacts

Garth Amundson (Art) and his students believe that peer learning is essential for their future professional lives.
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Value of Peer Learning
Value of Peer Learning

Joseph Garcia (Karen W. Morse Institute for Leadership) and some of his students discuss positive outcomes, the importance of learning from peers, setting the tone for peer learning, and strategies for getting students to give and receive good feedback.
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Peer Learning Leadership Model
Peer Learning Leadership Model

Joseph Garcia (Karen W. Morse Institute for Leadership) explains the basic structure of the leadership studies program at Western Washington University and some of his student participants provide insight on how this model works.
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Inspiration for Peer Learning
Inspiration for Peer Learning

Joseph Garcia (Karen W. Morse Institute for Leadership) describes why he developed a peer learning model at Western Washington University; he and some of his students comment on why it makes sense to have students learn leadership theory in a collaborative setting.
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Mentoring Students as Leaders
Mentoring Students as Leaders

Joseph Garcia (Karen W. Morse Institute for Leadership) and one of his peer leaders describe what happens in the Advanced Leadership class as the peer discussion session facilitators evolve as leaders and become mentors to the 101 students.
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Future Leaders
Future Leaders

Joseph Garcia (Karen W. Morse Institute for Leadership) and a few of his students talk about why internalizing and applying leadership concepts is so essential for their future in the real world.
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Team Project Genesis
Team Project Genesis

Drawing on her professional background, Ann Stone reflects on how peer learning became an essential part of her teaching practice.
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Creative Brief Exersise
Creative Brief Exersise

Ann Stone describes her “Creative Brief Exercise,” a team-based project that closely aligns to professional enactment for a career in marketing, and gets the audience involved via roleplaying.
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Team Challenges
Team Challenges

Based on her experiences using team projects, Ann Stone presents some of the key challenges to the team process and how overcoming these builds cohesion and competence in future group work.
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Peer Learning Benefits
Peer Learning Benefits

Ann Stone describes the most important benefits of having her students learn from their peers.
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World of Work
World of Work

Ann Stone believes passionately that peer learning—and the ability to give and receive good feedback—is integral to the future “world of work” for her students.
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Teaching, Dialog, and Tolerance
Teaching, Dialog, and Tolerance

Drawing on her educational background, Nicole Brown describes how she addresses diversity issues through dialogue in her teaching practice.
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Creating Space for Divergent Viewpoints
Creating Space for Divergent Viewpoints

Nicole Brown explains how she and her students, together, create a supporting environment for the expression of divergent viewpoints in discussions and presentations.
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Community Based Projects / Group Dynamics
Community Based Projects / Group Dynamics

Community-based projects play an essential role in students' development of material for various audiences and in their exploration of group dynamics.
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Classroom Environment
Classroom Environment

Engaging in persuasive discourse without creating a hostile classroom environment can be a challenge, but Nicole Brown helps her students engage in open discussions and transcend academic "real world" boundaries.
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Customized Teaching and Learning
Customized Teaching and Learning

Nicole Brown customizes the teaching and learning process to ensure an authentic learning process as her students grapple with issues from different perspectives.
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Work and Payoff of Camp
Work and Payoff of Camp

According to Jill Heckathorn, creating authentic experiential learning opportunities for students is a lot of work, but the payoff for students and her own reward as a teacher is well-worth the effort.
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Discovering an Environment for Change
Discovering an Environment for Change

Jill Heckathorn has realized that structuring the environment in her courses and assignments needs to be done in a way that allows for students' own discovery as their worldviews change.
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Heads, Hands, and Heart of Exp. Learning
Heads, Hands, and Heart of Exp. Learning

For her students to arrive at this "shift" in their diversity awareness, Jill Heckathorn has found that experiential learning opportunities are a key factor, especially when a sense of ceremony, celebration, and reflection are a part of it.
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Teaching Beyond Tolerance
Teaching Beyond Tolerance

Jill Heckathorn explains what she means by "teaching beyond tolerance" including the progression that she discovered that could also include acknowledgment, acceptance, appreciation, respect, and, ultimately, reverence.
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The Transformation
The Transformation

Through powerful comments, written reflections, and even in observed behavior, Jill Heckathorn has seen the transformation in her students after participating in out-of-class experiences with people with disabilities, with older adults, and with people in different cultures.
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Mindful Choices in Talking about Diversity
Mindful Choices in Talking about Diversity

"Embrace the chaos!" is one of Carolyn Nielsen's ideas for discussing diversity with her students; using memorable case studies is another strategy for developing critical thinking skills.
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Diversity as an Ethical Issue
Diversity as an Ethical Issue

Carolyn Nielsen believes that good journalists can tell the full picture of a community and that preparing her students to do this is not only important; it's ethical.
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Perspectives on Inclusive Learning
Perspectives on Inclusive Learning

Carolyn Nielsen describes how her background as a journalist made her realize how her own education did not prepare her to write and report about underrepresented communities.
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Achieving Diversity Goals
Achieving Diversity Goals

Carolyn Nielsen integrates several approaches throughout her curriculum, including small group work, self-reflection exercises, and the essential "Plan B" to ensure she is meeting her diversity goals for her instruction.
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Guiding Students' Experiences
Guiding Students' Experiences

Asking tough questions is part of the job of a journalist; Carolyn Nielsen guides her students in this process as they explore often-touchy topics in diversity and social justice.
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Achieving Teaching Goals
Achieving Teaching Goals

Dr. Jason Kanov creates opportunities in his classes for students to engage off-line, such as discussion boards on the course website. He also encourages students to participate during the class as well. These opportunities allow him to check on his students' knowledge and to see if they have achieved the goals he has for them.
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Managing the Context
Managing the Context

Dr. Jason Kanov of Western Washington University's Department of Management uses the concept of 'Managing the Context' to describe his course, as well as the business environment his students will be creating once they graduate. By controlling, or managing the context of the instructional environment, Dr. Kanov hopes to promote his students' engagement with the course material.
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Motivating Students
Motivating Students

Dr. Jason Kanov tries to promote a sense of personal responsibility in his management students. He not only teaches it, but models it in his own teaching. He uses team-based assignments to help promote students' awareness of their roles in team projects. Students can then examine how group dynamics can influence their own and others' effectiveness as team members.
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Logistics of Large Classes
Logistics of Large Classes

Grading and evaluation can be difficult and time-consuming for instructors of large courses. Dr. Jason Kanov of Western Washington University's Department of Management describes his own time challenges. He has chosen to construct his tests so that they contain essay questions, instead of more easily graded multiple choice items. Dr. Kanov believes he can evaluate both his students' work, and his own instruction better by constructing his tests in this manner.
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Teaching as Performance
Teaching as Performance

Because large classes are often taught in auditoriums and instructors often teach from a stage, students may be expecting a 'performance' from their instructor in such classes. Dr Jason Kanov from WWU's Department of Management, takes the role of the emcee, instead of the 'star' of the class, with movie clips, lecture slides, and other students as cast members in the performance. This makes the environment more familiar to students, and brings other voices into the course.
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Learning Environmental Science
Learning Environmental Science

Dr. David Shull, of Western Washington University's Huxley College of the Environment, believes that students learn environmental science best out of doors in nature. He also thinks that an important component of environmental science education is to teach students to use critical thinking when evaluating claims concerning the environment.
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Critical Thinking in Large Classes
Critical Thinking in Large Classes

Dr. David Shull promotes critical thinking in his large environmental science course by assigning students to read articles that have opposing points of view on critical environmental issues, and carefully examining them to find flaws in the reasoning or science. Students answer questions online about the articles before the class meeting in which the articles are discussed, thus preparing them for more effective discussion.
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Going Paperless
Going Paperless

Dr. David Shull, who teaches environmental science to students at Western Washington University, demonstrates to his large class how small acts can add together to have big effects. In his 450 student environmental science class, he puts his syllabus, some of his tests, and many assignments online, and uses electronic communication with his students. This allows him to go almost paperless in his large class, and save reams of paper in the process.
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Maintaining Objectivity
Maintaining Objectivity

Early on in his environmental science course, Dr. David Shull informs students about differing views on environmental issues. He views his own role in the course as that of a fact broker, and uses guest speakers to present differing views on sensitive environmental issues. This allows him to maintain his own objectivity and not be seen as promoting one side or the other on controversial issues such as climate change, genetically modified organisms, or offshore drilling.
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Large Class Service Learning
Large Class Service Learning

Dr. David Shull believes that one way to get a large environmental science class out into nature is by incorporating a service learning project into his class. He uses a WWU campus group, called LEAD, to help provide service learning opportunities for his students. Students work to restore local habitat, remove invasive species, and at the Outback Farm on WWU's campus.
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Writing in Large Classes
Writing in Large Classes

Assigning writing assignments in large courses can be difficult because of the grading load. Dr. Larry Symons has successfully used low stakes writing assignments in his large introductory psychology class at Western Washington University. Students read articles from a psychology reader, submit answers electronically through the course management system, which are then graded on a pass-fail basis by a teaching assistant.
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Taking Exams Online
Taking Exams Online

Dr. Larry Symons uses a combination of both in-class and online examinations to assess the learning of his introductory psychology students. Using an online examination frees up class time for more lecture and discussion, while being easier to administer than an in-class examination to such a large group. While his online exams are valued by his students, Dr. Symons believes they must be sufficiently rigorous to generate a good distribution of grades, something that is relatively hard to do.
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Engaging Students' Attention
Engaging Students' Attention

Dr. Larry Symons uses several strategies to engage and keep his students' attention in his large introductory psychology course. He uses short video clips as dynamic overheads, as well as participatory demonstrations to help maintain students' attention throughout the class period.
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Students as Consumers
Students as Consumers

Dr. Larry Symons uses his students' desires and proclivities as levers for their own learning. Using the student as consumer metaphor, Dr. Symons provides 'extras' to his students, such as posting his lecture notes online, to allow them to get extra 'value' for the money and time they invest in the course.
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Designing Large Courses
Designing Large Courses

Dr. Larry Symons, who teaches in the Department of Psychology at Western Washington University, believes that the most important thing in his large introductory psychology class is for his students to be engaged and think deeply about the topics under consideration. Dr. Symons helps his students feel invested in the process, learning something that they want to learn, rather than ought to learn.
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New Theories and Information
New Theories and Information

Professors Johann Neem, Julia Sapin, Pete Stelling, Vinit Jagdish, and Kendra Douglas discuss the new theories and information they have learned from attending mini-courses taught by other members of the Faculty GUR Group at Western Washington University.
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Commitment to General Education
Commitment to General Education

Professors Vinit Jagdish, Johann Neem, Kendra Douglas, Pete Stelling, and Grace Wang describe how the Faculty GUR Group has strengthened their own commitment to general education at Western Washington University. It has made the abstract idea of a liberal education tangible.
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Teaching Methods
Teaching Methods

Professors Grace Wang, Julia Sapin, Kendra Douglas, Julia Sapin, and Vinit Jagdish describe how they will incorporate some of the new teaching methods they have seen demonstrated by their colleagues in the Faculty GUR Group at Western Washington University.
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Genisis of the Group
Genisis of the Group

The Faculty GUR Group was created by Professors Johann Neem and Pete Stelling in order to bring together faculty from different departments across the university in a learning community to enhance each participants' general education by relying on each other's domain of expertise.
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Faculty Learning Community Conference
Faculty Learning Community Conference

Pete Stelling & Kendra Douglas describe the Faculty Learning Community Developers and Facilitators Summer Institute & Conference that was facilitated by Milton Cox, Director of the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching at Miami University, and Laurie Richlin, Director of Faculty Development at Charles Drew University of Medicine & Science.
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Classroom Practice
Classroom Practice

Members of Woodring College of Education's Multicultural Faculty Fellows Program discuss using the power of teachers to be positive role models for students. Kristen French believes that liberal arts education can be conceived of as education for liberation. The program can also be used as a laboratory to try out new classroom ideas and to refine and improve existing classroom assignments and materials.
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Dedicated to the Work
Dedicated to the Work

Members involved in the Multicultural Faculty Fellows program at the Woodring College of Education are extremely dedicated to their work. They are interested in using this work to help create schools that are just places for all students, to feed their own research into social justice and transformative education, and to support each others classroom practice.
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Multicultural Faculty Fellows
Multicultural Faculty Fellows

The Multicultural Faculty Fellows Program is a Woodring College of Education critical literacy collaborative with members from diverse departments and programs. The Dean of Woodring, Stephanie Salzman, and Kristen French, of the Colleges Center for Education, Equity and Diversity, planned the program to create a space for faculty to promote transformative education and to feed the members research and interests in multicultural education.
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Applying the Process
Applying the Process

Kristen French, of Woodring College of Education's Multicultural Faculty Fellows Program, believes that others who wish to create a similar program need to first approach the process with dignity, having support for each member, and to make sure that the support involves forgiveness as well as solidarity. The program involves enacting knowledge, reflection, and actions, and is organized similarly to the Maori Spiral Discourse Model.
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Measurements of Success
Measurements of Success

Kristen French describes ways to measure the success of the program. Because it is a dynamic process, she believes that the process is more important than the outcomes, such as critical consciousness or transformation. For these reasons, qualitative research may be most appropriate to perform. The group has been audio taping discussions, journaling, and writing poems. Once they have collaborated on their choices, these will be the basis for publications and for presentation at conferences.
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Spread the Word
Spread the Word

Building an authentic equitable partnership was key to the success of the NCOSP project. Grounding the work in a theory of learning was also crucial to its success. Giving the participants ample time to absorb the information, get feedback, and practice it were also important.
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Summer Academy for Teacher Leaders
Summer Academy for Teacher Leaders

NCOSP created a sequential series of three residential Summer Academies to improve content knowledge and reinforce conceptual, constructivist science teaching strategies among participating teachers. Each Academy included a Content Immersion experience that explored a small number of scientific topics to achieve a deep level of conceptual understanding.
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Genesis of the Partnership
Genesis of the Partnership

The North Cascades and Olympic Science Partnership is a National Science Foundation funded project involving 28 school districts, two education service districts, four community colleges, Washington State LASER, the Naval Undersea Museum, Washington State MESA, and Western Washington University.
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Teacher Preparation Reform
Teacher Preparation Reform

The primary motivation for NCOSP is improving the preparation of future teachers of science. The project leaders envisioned that the grant would allow them to revamp their science teaching methods courses and would help them get the experience to revise their content courses to reflect the latest research on teaching and learning. This would allow them to change the way that higher education faculty think about teaching and learning.
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Evidence of Success
Evidence of Success

The North Cascades and Olympic Science Partnership (NCOSP) will conclude its NSF-funded period with many institutionalized components that will have a lasting and positive impact on science education.
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Writing Scientifically
Writing Scientifically

Professor Robert Mitchell emphasizes proficiency in writing fundamentals not only as an integral part of communication in the field of scientific research, but as a means to demonstrate comprehension of concepts to others.
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Writing Instruction
Writing Instruction

For his coursework, Robert Mitchell identifies two distinct areas of writing focus: fundamentals and mechanics, and the specific language and structure of a scientific paper. This practice heightens student awareness of both the technical aspects of writing, as well as the methodology of scientific writing.
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Assessing Writing Instruction
Assessing Writing Instruction

By fielding feedback from a variety of sources—ranging from students who have graduated from the University and are employed in the scientific research field to questions posed to active students near the conclusion of course—Professor Robert Mitchell is able to dynamically analyze the strengths and weaknesses of his coursework as it applies to enhancing student writing.
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Writing About Research
Writing About Research

Professor Robert Mitchell utilizes local examples of ecological and geological issues to engage the scientific awareness of his students. This also allows a progressive cycle of research, as the class is able to attain their data in a field setting and then express their findings and conclusions in writing.
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Daily Writing Tips
Daily Writing Tips

By implementing a daily writing tip into his lecture, Professor Robert Mitchell is able to continuously emphasize the importance of writing fundamentals to his classes, as well as supplement their understanding of common grammatical and structural errors that occur when writing scientific papers.
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Writing Fellows
Writing Fellows

Through her involvement with the WWU Writing Fellows organization - a group of instructors representing a broad variety of departments and disciplines, who share in an economy of ideas for promoting writing fundamentals on campus - Professor Sapin is able to continuously intruduce new learning concepts into her core focus: the encouragement of a culture of writing at Western.
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Writing Center Partnership
Writing Center Partnership

By nurtuting an ongoing working relationship with the campus Writing Center, Julia Sapin is able to offer her students a support system which they can use to address concerns or questions that they may have regarding specific aspects of their academic writing.
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Variety of Assignments
Variety of Assignments

Professor Julia Sapin offers a selection of assignments which emphasizes both the technical and creative aspects of writing, allowing her to nurture a variety of student personalities and individual learning styles.
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Real World Settings
Real World Settings

By implementing exercises with real-world applications such as facilitated online role-playing for lower-division classes and an opportunity to put on an art and design exhibition for students in upper-division sections, Professor Julia Sapin is able to enhance her classes' interaction with the core course material.
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Low Stakes and High Stakes
Low Stakes and High Stakes

Julia Sapin divides her assignments into two catergories for her students: those considered "low stakes" emphasize developing an argument over specific aspects such as grammar and represent a small portion of the grade, and those considered "high stakes" involve research or projects and are worth a greater portion of the grade. This allows Professor Sapin to cultivate awareness of writing fundamentals and work progressively with students to polish these skills.
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The Oldest Profession
The Oldest Profession

Kathleen Saunders bases her pedagogy on the belief that teaching is not only the oldest profession in human society, but that it represents a cultural tradition of distributing knowledge and experience to the younger generation.
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Writing Benefits
Writing Benefits

By diversifying the content of her syllabus into coursework that emphasizes valuable problem-solving skills and social interaction, Kathleen Saunders is able to enhance and enrich the classroom experience for her students. Dynamic application of assignments also means that she can gauge feedback as it happens, and measure the effectiveness of specific exercises and projects.
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Writing as Gatekeeper
Writing as Gatekeeper

Kathleen Saunders places emphasis on the cultivation of basic writing skills not only as a means to academic success, but as a "gatekeeper" for crucial social and professional skills.
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Community Action Project
Community Action Project

Kathleen Saunders utilizes a research project known as the CAP (Community Action Project) to support her pedagogical emphasis on real-life writing applications. Through the CAP. students are connected with a national network of classrooms and assigned to a letter-writing campaign in relation to a topical anthropological ethical issue.
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Large Lecture Writing
Large Lecture Writing

In order to ease the transition in coursework expectations between general university and upper-division classes, Kathleen Saunders focuses on a personalized evaluation process for students in her large-scale lecture courses.
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Carrots and Sticks
Carrots and Sticks

Professor Julie Lockhart believes that creative tax incentives can promote sustainability, especially on the state level. Using tax incentives, rather than fining bad behavior, can have a positive impact on the behavior of corporations.
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The Scottish Connection
The Scottish Connection

During a sabbatical leave at the Center for Social and Environmental Accounting Research at St. Andrews University in Scotland, Julie Lockhart created a course in environmental accounting.
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Environmental Accounting Course
Environmental Accounting Course

Professor Julie Lockhart’s environmental accounting course is a standalone course that uses traditional accounting models to explore sustainability. Her course allows accounting students to connect their previous learning about accounting with environmental concepts.
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Connecting with Students
Connecting with Students

Through her own environmental activism Professor Julie Lockhart makes long-lasting connections with her students, some of whom apply what they learned in her environmental accounting class to their future careers in accounting.
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Pipeline Explosion Case Study
Pipeline Explosion Case Study

Professor Julie Lockhart of Western Washington University uses the Olympic Pipeline Explosion case study in her environmental accounting course to explore how corporations report environmental disasters, and to give her students an opportunity to see how reporting guidelines can be used to report events that have a negative impact on the environment. Using well-known local case studies can promote student engagement with course material.
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The 2010 Imperative
The 2010 Imperative

In this video, Arunas Oslapas describes how the industrial design program at Western Washington University has added a sustainability factor to every course.
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Sustainability Inspiration
Sustainability Inspiration

Arunas Oslapas inspires his students to incorporate sustainability concepts into their designs by exposing them to the ideas of others and to companies whose practices incorporate sustainable design.
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Industrial Design Revolution
Industrial Design Revolution

Arunas Oslapas explains how he became an industrial designer, and argues for a revolution in industrialism. He believes products should be designed so that they can eventually be used to create new products through recycling or through biological composting. He believes all products can therefore become nutrients for the next generation of products.
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Roma Bags
Roma Bags

Western Washington University industrial design student Jennifer Lynn took an assignment for a course and turned it into a growing business. Using "found objects" she created beautiful handbags.
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Trash to Cash
Trash to Cash

In Arunas Oslapas's industrial design course, students turn found objects into marketable products.
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Engaging Students
Engaging Students

Dr. Grace Wang tries to engage her environmental studies students by having them look at basic environmental concepts from different points of view, then forming their own thoughts.
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All About Me
All About Me

Students in Grace Wang’s environmental policy classes study the impact of the chemicals they put into their bodies. This “body burdens” assignment promotes active learning and motivates students to engage with the course material.
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Community Outreach
Community Outreach

Grace Wang’s environmental studies students have the opportunity to engage in outreach both through the University and the community. Dr. Wang believes that environmental studies students should be good environmental citizens as well as good students.
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Real-life Dilemmas
Real-life Dilemmas

Dr. Grace Wang uses interactive techniques in her environmental policy courses, including mock town halls, debates, and case studies. This allows her to convey the real-life dilemmas encountered by various stakeholders, including government personnel, corporations, farmers, ranchers, and hunters.
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Point of View
Point of View

One of the critical skills students in Grace Wang’s environmental studies classes must acquire is the ability to understand and appreciate the various points of view of everyone with a stake in environmental issues.
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The Era of Assimilation
The Era of Assimilation

Dr. Larry Estrada believes that the climate at U.S. colleges and universities has changed since September 11, 2001. There has been a greater emphasis on assimilation as opposed to cultural pluralism. This makes it more important than ever for colleges and universities to provide an education that informs this debate.
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The World Classroom
The World Classroom

Several new courses dealing with diversity and Mexican culture were developed by Dr. Larry Estrada at Western Washington University. Dr. Estrada believes that students receive many additional learning opportunities by living and learning outside of their home countries.
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The Fairhaven Community
The Fairhaven Community

Fairhaven College is part of Western Washington University. As a faculty member at Fairhaven, Dr. Larry Estrada describes the differences between Fairhaven's approach to instruction and the traditional lecture format.
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Promoting Multiculturalism
Promoting Multiculturalism

Colleges and universities have an obligation to promote the understanding of different cultural and societal values, according to Dr. Larry Estrada. This will prepare students as they leave college to become better global citizens.
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Cooperative Learning
Cooperative Learning

Dr. Larry Estrada uses cooperative learning strategies in his college classes to promote deep, transformative, and engaged learning.
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Loving Learning
Loving Learning

Dr. Edward Vajda hopes to instill a love of learning in students who take his courses in linguistics, Russian, and Asian culture and history. Through his own enthusiasm and infectious interest for his subject, students begin to engage with the material and develop a love for learning that can extend beyond their college career into their future lives.
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The Ket People
The Ket People

Dr. Edward Vajda spent a year in Siberia studying the Ket people, one of the last hunter-gatherer groups in Asia. There are only 1200 Ket left, and their language is dying out, perhaps to be gone within a generation. Ket is an isolate, like Basque in Spain, completely unrelated to neighboring languages, and contains many typologically rare linguistic features. At the end of the clip a native speaker of Ket tells a folk-tale in her native language, "How the Cuckoo Came to Be."
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Educating Global Citizens
Educating Global Citizens

Dr. Edward Vajda's research on the Ket peoples in Siberia brings information and experience to his classroom that wouldn't be possible if he had just read about it in a book. Studying such an unusual language allows Dr. Vajda to bring in many examples to his linguistic classes of a language that isn't in a textbook, thus inspiring his students to become interested in different groups of people in different parts of the world.
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The Nomads of Asia
The Nomads of Asia

There are many parallels between the Mongols of the 13th century and the United States today. Students in Dr. Edward Vajda's Nomads of Asia course learn about many of these parallels, including the fact that the Mongols were the lone superpower in their time, allowed freedom of religion and established the world's first transcontinental free trade zone. There are even military parallels between the Mongol Empire and modern America. Focusing on such unexpected similarities makes the course relevant and stimulating.
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Learning Russian
Learning Russian

Learning Russian is a very interactive enterprise in Dr. Edward Vajda's first-year Russian classes. He teaches entirely in Russian, and allows the students to understand the Russian vocabulary by using contextual cues. Dr. Vajda also brings in Russian culture to make the course more interesting and engaging.
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Attending Genocide Conference
Attending Genocide Conference

Dr. Kathleen Young took students with her to the Genocide Conference and memorial service to commemorate the 10 year anniversary of the massacre in Srebrenica, Bosnia. Students who attended the Genocide Conference in Sarajevo also accompanied Dr. Young to Den Hague to the International Criminal Tribunal and the trial of Slobodan Milosevic.
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Thinking Like Anthropologists
Thinking Like Anthropologists

Students in Dr. Kathleen Young’s courses are exposed to scenarios in which they are encouraged to "think like anthropologists."
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Building Emotional Muscle
Building Emotional Muscle

In her classes, Dr. Kathleen Young stresses to students that it is important to build up to studying difficult subjects such as death, dying, genocide, and war. Students develop emotional muscle and become "scholar warriors" as they learn to avoid compassion fatigue.
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Being Human
Being Human

Dr. Kathleen Young believes that by exploring what it means to be human in other cultures we come to a better understanding of our own lives. She states that students want to know why they haven’t been exposed to subjects such as war, genocide, suffering, death, and dying, and she believes that it is their right to know and study these difficult areas.
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Educating for Life
Educating for Life

Dr. Kathleen Young believes it is important for students to have knowledge of how different cultures handle difficult subjects such as war, death and dying, and genocide. These students move on after college to become educated citizens of the world.
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Case Study Discussion
Case Study Discussion

Dr. Burton teaches his Ethics in Business Decisions course using the case study method. Students in the course use an ethical decision-making framework to discuss a case.
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Ethics Across the Curriculum
Ethics Across the Curriculum

Ethics is often taught as a special course within a program or discipline. Dr. burton describes why ethics should be taught in more than one special course.
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Student Benefits
Student Benefits

In this clip, Dr. Burton outlines the benefits that students receive as a result of their studying ethical issues in a business context.
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Effective Ethics Instruction
Effective Ethics Instruction

In this clip, Dr. Brian Burton describes how ethics can most effectively be taught to undergraduates.
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Ethical Behavior
Ethical Behavior

One of the goals of teaching ethics, according to Dr. Burton, is to promote ethical behavior once students have left the University.
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Ethics in the Laboratory
Ethics in the Laboratory

Ethics can be more effectively discussed in the laboratory section of a general biology class, because of the lab sections' small size, and because students have built relationships with each other during lab exercises throughout the quarter.
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Tools for Learning Biology
Tools for Learning Biology

Students need to acquire intellectual tools to enable them to understand new biological information. Janice Lapsansky describes how these tools can enable students to more effectively learn and discuss bioethics.
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Ethics Assignment Lessons
Ethics Assignment Lessons

In this clip, Janice Lapsansky outlines the benefits that students receive as a result of their studying bioethics. She also describes some of the challenges that can arise, and suggests possible solutions to these challenges.
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Ethics in Biology
Ethics in Biology

In this clip, Janice Lapsansky describes how ethical issues arise in the discipline of biology.
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Philosophy of Teaching and Learning
Philosophy of Teaching and Learning

Janice Lapsansky describes how the bioethics lab exercise reflects on her own philosophy of teaching and learning.
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Next Steps
Next Steps

Dr. Newcomer and his colleagues believe that ethics should be included in more advanced courses after the ethics and technical writing course.
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Ethics Case Studies
Ethics Case Studies

In this clip, Dr. Newcomer describes how case studies are used in engineering technology to teach ethics.
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Tools for Teaching Ethics
Tools for Teaching Ethics

Professional codes of ethics and case studies are the two tools that are used to teach ethics in the engineering technology curriculum.
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Ethics Collaborations
Ethics Collaborations

In this clip, Dr. Jeff Newcomer describes the collaborative process that was used to embed ethics into the engineering technology department. An upper-division course was created that combined ethics with technical writing.
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Ethics in Engineering Technology
Ethics in Engineering Technology

Dr. Newcomer describes how ethics instruction was integrated with the technical material in the engineering technology department.
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Reflections
Reflections

Professor Bussell and his students discuss the benefits they have derived from doing collaborative research together.
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Presenting Research
Presenting Research

Professor Bussell and his students present their data at professional conferences, thus increasing the students’ abilities to communicate professionally. This allows students to meet other professionals and make connections for their future careers.
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Undergraduate Research Value
Undergraduate Research Value

In this video, Professor Bussell describes the process he goes through when he begins collaborative research work with undergraduate students.
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Balancing the Load
Balancing the Load

Autumn Burns and Melissa Pease discuss how they balance their undergraduate research projects with their other coursework.
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Collaboration Teaching
Collaboration Teaching

Autumn Burns and Melissa Pease discuss how they balance their undergraduate research projects with their other coursework.
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Critical Thinking
Critical Thinking

One of the major goals of having students do collaborative research projects is for them to become better critical thinkers. Dr. Bussell believes that this is because students are working on unanswered or unsolved research questions.
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Research Strategies
Research Strategies

Professor Bussell and his students present their data at professional conferences, thus increasing the students’ abilities to communicate professionally. This allows students to meet other professionals and make connections for their future careers.
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Using the PAR Approach
Using the PAR Approach

In this video, Professor Bussell describes the process he goes through when he begins collaborative research work with undergraduate students.
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Collaboration Benefits
Collaboration Benefits

Professor Bussell and his students discuss the benefits they have derived from doing collaborative research together.
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Collaboration Benefits
Collaboration Benefits

One of the major goals of having students do collaborative research projects is for them to become better critical thinkers. Dr. Bussell believes that this is because students are working on unanswered or unsolved research questions.
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Guided Discussion
Guided Discussion

Dawn Dietrich and Tony Prichard teach their course mostly through guided discussion, rather than lecture format. In this video, they describe why this respects student voices and helps students come to appreciate other perspectives.
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Relating to Students
Relating to Students

This video describes how Dawn Dietrich and Tony Prichard began their professional collaboration. It also describes the advantages of having another student teaching in the classroom.
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Student as Teacher
Student as Teacher

Tony Prichard describes how he balances his two roles as student and as teacher. He also describes why it is important for his own future career to teach the film course with an instructor who shares common interests with him, but who is also an experienced teacher.
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Collaborative Teaching
Collaborative Teaching

Professor Dietrich believes that her collaboration with Tony Prichard provides a model for students to witness the way knowledge and critical thinking are produced in specific discourse communities. The new film minor that is being offered by the English Department is also described in this video, as well as the diverse group of students who take the course.
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Student Video Project
Student Video Project

Student Video Project, Unavailable At This Time
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Encouraging Dialogue
Encouraging Dialogue

Encouraging a give-and-take dialogue in his classes is very important to Professor Mana. He accomplishes this by intentionally breaking down unnecessary barriers between him and his students.
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Collaboration Benefits
Collaboration Benefits

The benefits of the collaborative student-faculty assessment and learning outcome project are described by Mike Mana and Kyle Nelson in this video.
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Assessment Tools
Assessment Tools

Mike Mana describes two tools that were created during the collaboration with his students. One of these is the “blocked syllabus” in which only two weeks of the syllabus schedule is presented at a time. This allows for greater flexibility during the course of the quarter. The other strategy is the integration of a research paper and presentation poster assignment.
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Working with Students
Working with Students

In this video, Mike Mana describes a project in which he worked with two psychology undergraduate students during the course of a summer to identify and improve assessment tools for his courses.
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Transforming Teaching
Transforming Teaching

As a result of working with students, Mike Mana was able to develop some tools and strategies that could be used in his other courses. Looking carefully at syllabi and other course assessments in this way has transformed his teaching.
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Reflection and Evaluation
Reflection and Evaluation

Dr. greer describes her evaluation techniques, by discussing her students' participation through rubrics, reflection journals, and site visits.
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Which Class to Choose
Which Class to Choose

Dr. Greer discusses which classes she chose to work with once she decided to begin using service-learning in her courses.
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Student Benefits
Student Benefits

Dr. greer describes how her students are impacted by community-based learning, and how they have extended these positive experiences beyond the classroom.
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Audiences for the Future
Audiences for the Future

In this video, Dr. greer explains why she chose to integrate community-based projects into all of her courses.
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Community Support
Community Support

Dr. greer explains how she coordinates her classes with Western's Center for Service-Learning and how she develops her own community-based projects.
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Rewards
Rewards

Dr. Harwood describes the rewards of staying connected with local schools.
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Learning Artifacts
Learning Artifacts

Dr. Harwood talks about one of her favorite aspects of the service-learning projects. She shows a "learning artifact" that an elementary school student created.
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Preparing Future Teachers
Preparing Future Teachers

Dr. Harwood talks about why she advocates service-learning as a teaching strategy.
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Valuable Lessons
Valuable Lessons

Dr. Harwood describes how valuable it is for her secondary education students to interact with practicing middle school teachers and students.
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Learning as Discovery
Learning as Discovery

Dr. Janson talks about how using community-based learning has influenced her teaching style. Learning becomes more of a discovery process and the students' community projects inform each class's lesson.
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Community Projects
Community Projects

Taylor Zajonc, an employee at the Center for Instructional Innovation, made this movie as a tribute to some of the community projects created during the quarter in Dr. Janson's class.
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Bridge to the Future
Bridge to the Future

Dr. Janson describes how community-based learning helps her students begin to make the transition from their university lives to their lives after graduation.
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Service-Learning Advice
Service-Learning Advice

Dr. Janson gives some advice to those who, like her, have just begun to use community-based learning in their college classrooms.
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Community in the Classroom
Community in the Classroom

Dr. Janson describes the process of bringing the community hosts into the classroom at the beginning of the quarter, and how the students examined their own talents and interests, and used these to select a project to complete.
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Student Benefits
Student Benefits

Tara Perry discusses how her approach through community-based learning affects her students' experiences.
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Communication at Work
Communication at Work

Tara Perry describes how students in her Professional Communication course develop workshops for local organizations to help solve problems.
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Working in Teams
Working in Teams

Tara Perry explains how her students learn the theories and concepts associated with working in teams such as decision-making, problem-solving, and conflict management.
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Common Threads
Common Threads

Tara Perry explains how service-learning is interwoven throughout the entirely of her courses through group projects, in-class assignments, and presentations.
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Connect to Community
Connect to Community

Tara Perry believes it is important for her students to connect with the community so they can learn civic responsibility and bring the classroom material to life.
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Designing for Needs
Designing for Needs

Professor Dodd designed the Introduction to Distance Education course to present the material to meet her students' needs.
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Authentic Experiences
Authentic Experiences

Professor Dodd describes her goal for her instruction: to make it authentic for her students and to continue improving it for the future.
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The Student Perspective
The Student Perspective

Professor Dodd believes her students enjoy and value her class because their needs are being met. Her students describe this in their own words.
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Learning and Doing
Learning and Doing

Since students often need to demonstrate what they know as they apply for jobs, Professor Dodd believes "learning and doing go hand in hand."
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Customizing Assignments
Customizing Assignments

Because students arrive in her class with varying goals and experiences, Professor Dodd uses surveys to customize the students' assignments and course objectives.
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Teaching Shakespeare
Teaching Shakespeare

Professor Geisler describes what he enjoys most about teaching Shakespeare to college students.
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Student Film Directors
Student Film Directors

Professor Geisler describes how he gets his students thinking of Shakespeare's plays, and imagining a dream cast for each play that they study.
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Using Film Clips
Using Film Clips

Professor Geisler describes the effect on his courses of his extensive use of film clips of Shakespeare's plays.
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Making Meaning
Making Meaning

Professor Geisler describes how his students make their own meaning when they study Shakespeare's plays.
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Student Collaboration
Student Collaboration

Professor Geisler describes the collaborative group projects that his students complete during his Shakespeare course.
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Document Readers
Document Readers

Professor Richards uses students as readers of primary historical documents during his courses. He describes why he uses them, and the advantages he sees for the students in his courses.
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Classroom Environment
Classroom Environment

Professor Richards promotes a classroom atmosphere that is free from judgments of "right and wrong." In this video he describes how he fosters that atmosphere in his history classes.
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Engaged in History
Engaged in History

In this video, Professor Richards discusses how he gets his students to become as engaged with history as he is.
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Student Historians
Student Historians

In this video, Professor Richards describes how students volunteer for a group project that allows them to be "history teachers for a day."
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Boot Camp
Boot Camp

Professor Richards describes his approach to teaching history by stating he is running an "intellectual boot camp." He then describes what that means in terms of his expectations for his students.
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Teaching as Reflection
Teaching as Reflection

Professor Tag describes how he reflects on teaching, and how he uses these reflections to inform his course design.
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Rewards and Challenges
Rewards and Challenges

Professor Tag describes the challenges revealed and rewards received by his utilization of Group Performance Projects in his courses.
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Students' Own Work
Students' Own Work

In this video, Professor Tag describes how his students participate in the humanities through their own work, not just by studying what others have done.
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Performance Project
Performance Project

In this video, Professor Tag describes the origin and transformation of the Group Performance Project in his course, "Humanities and the Expressive Arts" at WWU's Fairhaven College.
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Objectives
Objectives

Dr. Hansen describes the objectives for his students and for his courses.
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Design
Design

Dr. Hansen describes how he implements the design and tailors it for each class.
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Assessment
Assessment

Dr. Hansen describes his assessment methods in his courses.
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Process
Process

Dr. Hansen elaborates on his course design process. This clip also includes a story he tells in class, another very important element in his teaching.
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Teaching Media Literacy in the Digital Age
Teaching Media Literacy in the Digital Age

Dr. Pilgrim discusses the transformation of Journalism 190 from a lecture-based course to one using videos and web technologies.
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Editing -- from Paper to Screen
Editing -- from Paper to Screen

Dr. Pilgrim explains how Journalism 309 helps students learn editing skills and concepts the high-tech, modern way.
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Setting the Record Straight
Setting the Record Straight

Journalism 190 students discuss the course and the way it challenged their assumptions about mass media. Written and edited by Brandon Rosage.
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Election Project 2000
Election Project 2000

Link to an archived version of a live streaming media webcast done on Election Day by Journalism 190 students. This particular group used sock puppets to communicate their message.
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Introduction
Introduction

Dr. Roelofs describes his role as an experimental economist, how he became interested in using active learning techniques with his students, and how this has affected the structure of the course.
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Applications
Applications

Dr. Roelofs describes how instructors can use the active learning approach in other disciplines and how his students react to the approach.
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Approach
Approach

As students engage in experiments in his Introduction to Microeconomics class, Dr. Roelofs talks about the approach in terms of benefits for the learners and the challenges for the instructor.
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Experiment
Experiment

Dr. Roelofs sets the stage for an economics experiment where students play the roles of buyers and sellers in a cartel.
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Instructional Technologies
Instructional Technologies

Dr. Smeins discusses some of the instructional technologies she has successfully incorporated in her courses.
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Setting the Stage
Setting the Stage

Dr. Smeins encourages students to imagine themselves in ancient settings, and to begin to think critically about art and architecture.
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Teaching Art History Over the Years
Teaching Art History Over the Years

Dr. Smeins discusses how her teaching has changed over the years. Scenes from her art history course are included in this clip.
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Theoretical Perspectives
Theoretical Perspectives

Dr. Smeins discusses using different theoretical perspectives and is shown in class explaining one perspective.
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3D Medieval French Village
3D Medieval French Village

A 3-D medieval French village was created by adapting a game engine (Genesis 3d) that was freely available on the internet. Students were encouraged to walk through the village and explore its spaces.
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Collaboration
Collaboration

Dr. Kathy Whitmire, Director of the School Services Division of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, joined the March 28 discussion from her home in Rockville, Maryland.
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Classroom Set Up
Classroom Set Up

View a movie that demonstrates how the classroom was set up at WWU for the collaboration.
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Role of Technology
Role of Technology

From the first class collaboration: What is the role of technology in speech language pathology?
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Common Ground
Common Ground

Creating a common ground for discussion. Each class works toward a shared definition of the term "decontextualization."
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Advice for Large Courses
Advice for Large Courses

Advice for other professors who teach large lecture courses.
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Thinking Critically
Thinking Critically

Encouraging students to think critically about environmental issues.
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Future Plans
Future Plans

Future plans for Fall 2000 Environmental Science 101 course.
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Integrating Multimedia
Integrating Multimedia

A clip from Scott Brennan's Fall 1999 course integrating multimedia into the lecture.
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Using Technology
Using Technology

Using technology to interact more with his students.
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Lecture Design
Lecture Design

Professor Gynan explains the design of his Ebonics lecture, the technology behind the lecture, and the techniques used to engage his students.
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Instructor Objectives
Instructor Objectives

Professor Gynan discusses learning objectives for the Ebonics lecture.
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Gender
Gender

Working in teams, freshmen in an introductory political science course researched four conceptual areas relating to U.S. elections. Each team wrote reports and created their own website based on the reports. On election day the student teams gave five-minute presentations in streaming RealVideo format on the Internet.
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Ideologies
Ideologies

Working in teams, freshmen in an introductory political science course researched four conceptual areas relating to U.S. elections. Each team wrote reports and created their own website based on the reports. On election day the student teams gave five-minute presentations in streaming RealVideo format on the Internet.
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Money
Money

Working in teams, freshmen in an introductory political science course researched four conceptual areas relating to U.S. elections. Each team wrote reports and created their own website based on the reports. On election day the student teams gave five-minute presentations in streaming RealVideo format on the Internet.
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Parties
Parties

Working in teams, freshmen in an introductory political science course researched four conceptual areas relating to U.S. elections. Each team wrote reports and created their own website based on the reports. On election day the student teams gave five-minute presentations in streaming RealVideo format on the Internet.
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