FIG #28: Civil Resistance

FIG Pre-registration Fall 2017 is now closed. Please contact Rebecca McLean with any questions at (360)650-6607 or Rebecca.McLean@wwu.edu.


Cluster Description:
Students in this FIG will explore the political and historical contexts of civil resistance in the US, including questions concerning radicalization and the consequences of nonviolent resistance.

Courses

Class
 Instructor 
 Days 
 Time 
 Credits 
 GUR 
History 103
Jared Hardesty
MWF
8:30-9:50 am
5
HUM 
Political Science 250
with Lab
Debra Salazar
MTWR
T
12:00-12:50 pm
1:00-1:50 pm
5
SSC 
Seminar 101
Lily Fox
F
10:00-11:50 am
2
 

Total Credits:

12
 

Course Descriptions for Civil Resistance

  • History 103, American History to 1865, (Jared Hardesty) 5cr, HUM, CRN: 44121
    From ancient America to the end of the Civil War.
  • Political Science 250 with Lab, The American Political System , (Debra Salazar) 5cr, SSC, CRN: 43598
    Consideration of the system and process of American politics and government with primary focus on the national level.
  • Seminar 101, Seminar for First-Year Students, (Lily Fox) 2cr, CRN: 42984
    An introductory seminar offering an exploration of academic content and essential questions within the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Includes embedded instruction in academic skills and use of campus resources pertinent to exploration of the FIG cluster theme. Concludes in a formal paper or academic presentation. The American Dream reflects the mythos of U.S. identity and a celebration of a unique and distinctive American freedom. This dream has helped to propel prosperity, success, access to education, and liberal democracy, while also giving rise to slavery, the exploitation of industrial workers, and a constantly changing landscape of inequality. Moreover, as various groups have been frustrated in their pursuit of the American Dream, a succession of political movements has organized to push America toward realizing its promise of liberty and justice for all. In this seminar we will explore these features of the American Dream in discussions of its role in our past and future.

To see descriptions of other courses, see the University Catalog on which you may search for course information using the "binoculars" icon in the PDF viewer (Acrobat Reader).

Page Updated 6/7/17