FIG #13: The Salish Sea

Advance registration is now closed. You may make changes to your schedule at Summerstart or Fall Orientation. We look forward to seeing you in FIGs! Please contact Rebecca McLean with any questions at (360)650-6607 or Rebecca.McLean@wwu.edu.


Cluster Description:
Start off your time at Western by getting oriented to the Salish Sea region and developing a sense of place here. We will experience the Salish Sea through different disciplinary approaches by reading Coast Salish authors and stories of place, learning about regional ecology, digging into layers of geology and history in the area, examining local issues of justice and equity, and more. We will engage in experiential learning activities like walking tours, scavenger hunts, debates, and storytelling. This FIG will equip you with questions to ask of every place you live and visit, starting here on the Salish Sea.

Courses

Class
 Instructor 
 Days 
 Time 
 Credits 
 GUR 
Environmental Studies 202
Grace Wang
TR
10:00-11:20 am
3
SSC 
History 141
Jennifer Seltz
MWF
11:30-12:50 pm
5
BCGM 
Seminar 101
Natalie Baloy
M
4:00-5:50 pm
2
 

Total Credits:

10
 

Course Descriptions for The Salish Sea

  • Environmental Studies 202, Intro to Environmental Studies and Sustainability, (Grace Wang) 3cr, SSC, CRN: 43086
    A basic overview of environmental issues in the United States and globally. An emphasis will be placed on environmental and human sustainability in a social science context.
  • History 141, History of the American West, (Jennifer Seltz) 5cr, BCGM, CRN: 44120
    This course provides an introduction to the history of the place that we now know as the U.S. West. Stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean, the West has both been characterized by its diversity and bound together by a shared regional identity and history. Beginning with the eve of European expansion in the seventeenth century, but concentrating on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this course will focus on the historical processes that have defined the West and its place within the United States. Debates over access to land, natural resource management, federal power, racial and ethnic diversity, and the public good are central to western history. Using films, monographs, memoirs, letters, and articles, we will explore the struggles for land, resources, identity, and power which have characterized the West and its role in the nation, as well as the relationship between the western past and the myths and stories that have secured the region’s prominent place in the American imagination.
  • Seminar 101, Seminar for First-Year Students, (Natalie Baloy) 2cr, CRN: 40972
    An introductory seminar offering an exploration of academic content and essential questions within the liberal arts and sciences tradition. Includes embedded instruction in academic skills and use of campus resources pertinent to exploration of the FIG cluster theme. Concludes in a formal paper or academic presentation. Start off your time at Western by getting oriented to the Salish Sea region and developing a sense of place here. We will experience the Salish Sea through different disciplinary approaches by reading Coast Salish authors and stories of place, learning about regional ecology, digging into layers of geology and history in the area, examining local issues of justice and equity, and more. We will engage in experiential learning activities like walking tours, scavenger hunts, debates, and storytelling. This FIG will equip you with questions to ask of every place you live and visit, starting here on the Salish Sea.

To see descriptions of other courses, see the University Catalog on which you may search for course information using the "binoculars" icon in the PDF viewer (Acrobat Reader).

Page Updated 6/7/17